The story so far…

So I thought it best to start with how we got to this point…or more importantly, why the cb250rs??
Simply because it was there. Wayne had the cb250 and a ct110 (posties bike) both sitting waiting for a new lease of life. The choice for me was easy…250cc cafe racer!

The cb250rs was one of Wayne’s magical roadside discoveries for $200. The bike had then sat at “The Haven” for several years before catching my imagination. While the bike was alone and vulnerable with Wayne overseas on holiday, I pounced on the chance to make a start on the project.

The bike was rideable, but slipped out of second gear. She also needed a bit of work to get a roadworthy certificate. But otherwise was a complete bike. The previous owner had dropped it in a “parking accident” with hardly any visible damage other than denting the already dodgy exhaust. The standard 2 into 2 exhaust had been replaced with a 2:1 system which the previous owner had made himself – almost completely rusted out over the past few years of neglect. The seat was in good condition, the instrument panel worked fine, but the cables, throttle, grips, tyres, and spokes had all perished with the elements. From the outside, the wheels look to be in good condition, but I am curious to see the inside of the rims when we get the tyres off. There was plenty of tread on the tyre but the rubber was cracked and very brittle. The bike was screaming for some love, a complete rebuild and a new set of firestones.

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The CB250rs was a great bike back in the day. They were made from 1980-1984 before gaining a second cylinder and losing some of its fun. There are many fine (and many not so fine) examples still running around today. The RS (or racing single) when it rolled off the factory floor generated 26 bhp and could reach speeds approaching 90mph (145 km/hr). The bike was extremely light (< 130 kg) and equipped with a five speed gearbox. Early models had a kick start, complete with a cylinder decompression lever. The bike earned a good reputation for being a reliable commuter and fun weekend bike. The single cylinder was never going to make for a long distance cruiser, but was still a lot of fun on tight mountain roads.

I don’t have a fantastic plan yet… Will need to wait to assess the damage thus far. I am suspecting that there will prob be more parts for the bin than will be refitted to this little beauty.

Game on!!!

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